The 2010 LDS Film Festival Concludes

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LDS Film Festival 2010 BannerRealizing that I have been quiet for quite some time, I felt it appropriate to take a moment or two and summarize some recent thoughts in light of the conclusion of the ninth-annual LDS Film Festival. Because of my involvement along two fronts related to the festival this year, I’m afraid any sort of good overview of the festival cannot be offered by me. But fortunately, we had extensive coverage of the festival from the Deseret News’ Mormon Times department, so I will defer you to their coverage for more detailed information about the films that played this year.

Realizing that I have been quiet for quite some time, I felt it appropriate to take a moment or two and summarize some recent thoughts in light of the conclusion of the ninth-annual LDS Film Festival. Because of my involvement along two fronts related to the festival this year, I’m afraid any sort of good overview of the festival cannot be offered by me. But fortunately, we had extensive coverage of the festival from the Deseret News’ Mormon Times department, so I will defer you to their coverage for more detailed information about the films that played this year.

Because of my increased involvement with the film festival this year, I actually found myself with less time to view films than in years past, and consequently, overseeing more of the coordination effort with our wonderful volunteer force. We saw a record number of volunteers this year! The Newell family was out in full force this year. In addition to their tremendous support, we had many repeat volunteers that have now been helping out for the past two or three years. They were an invaluable asset in helping to get the festival off to a good start this year, and afforded us the opportunity to stay on top of ballot counting and crowd control.

We also enjoyed a new crop of volunteers this year, which brought new enthusiasm to the program. One of the unique aspects of the LDS Film Festival is its social atmosphere in which almost anyone can walk up to anyone and have a conversation on just about anything. Our new volunteers consisted of those who had wanted to get involved in years past, but had never had to opportunity to, and those who were attending the film festival for the very first time. I personally am appreciative of everyone who gave of their time to be involved.

Now, on an even more personal note, I wanted to take note of the one film that I did have the opportunity to view this past weekend: Another Testament. This film was created as a companion video to the beautifully produced images featured in the book: Reflections of Christ: Another Testament. I was expecting a well-produced documentary. What I discovered was a powerful film offering insights into the process of Christian film making, as well as a witness of Christ himself.

The filmmakers were present, Mark Mabry and Cameron Trejo. I had the privilege of speaking with Mark Marby briefly afterward. I warmly thanked him for his work. He replied graciously and observed that everyone involved with this project has drawn closer to the Savior as a result of it. From time to time, I encounter superficial testimonies of church doctrines being twisted to suit a personal situation. However, when Mark told me that he had had the privilege of coming to better know Christ as a result of this project, I knew he was telling me the truth. His humble countenance radiated with light.

The experience has changed me in ways that I cannot, nor should I, relate in this setting. Yet, I make note of Mark Mabry’s works Reflections of Chirst and Reflections of Christ: Another Testament, because this still photographer and his associates are pioneering the way for the future of Christian/LDS Cinema with their singular works and exhibitions. It is amazing to contemplate the Christ in this vivid personal testimony from the perspective of a photographer!

 

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Brent is married to a very supportive woman, is father of a large family, and went into business for himself in 2006.

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